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Content/Details

Difficulty (Explanation)
Other titles of this difficulty
Minuet (Nannerl Music Book) K. 1e
1 easy
Minuet (Nannerl Music Book) K. 5
2 easy
Allegro (Nannerl Music Book) K. 6
2 easy
Piece from the "London Music Book" F major K. 15hh
2 easy
Kontretanz "The Thunderstorm", Versions A and B D major K. 534
4 medium
Etüde C major K. 626b/48
4 medium
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About the Composer

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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Mozart is one of the few composers to have produced masterpieces in all genres. On the concert tours he undertook in his early years (London, Mannheim, Italy, Paris) he gained many varied musical impressions that he assimilated in his youth and which formed the prerequisite for his later consummate musical language.

1756Born in Salzburg on January 27, the son of musician and later court composer Leopold Mozart. His early regimented musical education from his father began in 1761, first compositions at age five.
1763–66Extended concert tours through various German cities and to Paris, London, Amsterdam, Switzerland. He composes his first sonatas for violin and piano, K. 10–15, dedicated to Queen Charlotte, as well as the first symphonies from London, K. 16 and 19, which show the influence of the works of Johann Christian Bach and Karl Friedrich Abel (the three-movement Italian sinfonia form).
1767Premiere in Salzburg of the sacred light opera “Die Schuldigkeit des ersten Gebotes,” K. 35 (written with Michael Haydn and Anton C. Adlgasser), and the intermezzo “Apollo et Hyacinthus,” K. 38. Journeys with his father and sister to Vienna.
1768Probably the premiere in Vienna of his Singspiel “Bastien and Bastienne,” K. 50. Composition of his first masses.
1769Performance in Salzburg of the dramma giocoso “La finta semplice,” K. 51.
1769–71Two tours to Italy; he meets Farinelli, P. Nardini, and Padre Martini, among others, and, on the second trip, Hasse. Premieres in Milan of his opera seria “Mitridate, Re di Ponto” in 1770 and of the festa teatrale “Ascanio in Alba” in 1771. Composition of symphonies and his first string quartet (1770, K. 80).
1771Composition of the oratorio “La Betulia liberate,” K. 118, in Salzburg/Italy.
1772Premiere of the serenata drammatica “Il sogno di Scipione,” K. 126, for the accession of Salzburg Archbishop Hieronymus Count Colloredo. He receives an appointment as salaried concertmaster of the Salzburg Court Chapel (of which he had been an unpaid member since 1769). Third journey to Italy with his father, premiere in Milan of the dramma per musica “Lucio Silla,” with general success. The final trip to Italy spells the ends of his youthful phase of appropriation; he has tested out all important instrumental genres (symphony, sonata, string quartet) and all the main genres of opera (Singspiel, opera buffa, opera seria, festa teatrale).
from 1773Composition of string quartets (K. 168–173) under the influence of Haydn, and of symphonies, divertimenti, serenades. He increasingly devotes himself, contingent upon the duties of his post, to liturgical music; several masses are written. Begins to compose violin and piano concerti.
1775Premiere in Munich of the dramma giocoso “La finta giardiniera” and the serenata “Il Rè pastore.” Piano sonatas, K. 279–284.
1777He vacates his post temporarily to undertaken a promotional tour with his mother to Munich, Mannheim, and Paris.
1778Composition of the “Paris” Symphony in D major (K. 297). In Paris he experiences the quarrel between the proponents of Gluck and those of Piccinni. Publication of violin sonatas.
1779Resumes his duties in Salzburg, as court organist. Coronation Mass in C major.
1781Premiere in Munich of his tragédie lyrique “Idomeneo,” in which French and Italian elements are synthesized. Journey to Vienna. After his falling out with the Archbishop of Salzburg, he gives up his post, moves to Vienna, and earns his living as a free composer through concertizing and giving music lessons. His last great period of creativity begins.
1782He becomes acquainted with the works of Bach and Handel through Baron van Swieten; after this he arranges Bachian fugues and incorporates the “learned style” (fugues and counterpoint) into his works beside the “galant style” (e.g. in the String Quartet in G major, K. 387, in 1782; Piano Sonata in F major, K. 533, in 1786; the Jupiter Symphony, K. 551, in 1788; “Die Zauberflöte” (“The Magic Flute”), and the Requiem in D minor, K. 626, both in 1791). Premiere in Vienna of his Singspiel “Die Entführung aus dem Serail” (“The Abduction from the Seraglio”). Composition of the Haffner Symphony in D major, K. 385.
1783Mass in C minor, K. 427; Linz Symphony in C major, K. 425.
1784Hunt Quartet in B-flat major, K. 458.
1785Premiere in Vienna of the oratorio “Davide penitente,” K. 469. “Dissonance” Quartet in C major, K. 465.
1786Premiere of the comedy with music “Der Schauspieldirektor” (“The Impresario”), K. 486, which Salieri’s competing work “Prima la musica e poi le parole” (“First the Music and Then the Words”) bests. Premiere in Vienna of the opera buffa “Le nozze di Figaro” (“The Marriage of Figaro”), whose extended action-packed finales form a highpoint of opera buffa. Prague Symphony in D major, K. 504.
1787Serenade in G major (“Eine kleine Nachtmusik”), K. 525. He is named imperial and royal chamber composer. Premiere in Prague of the dramma giocoso “Il dissoluto punito ossia Il Don Giovanni,” a synthesis of serious and comic opera.
1788Composition of the large Symphonies in E-flat major, K. 543; G minor, K. 550; and C major (Jupiter Symphony), K. 551. Clarinet Quintet in A major, K. 581.
1790Premiere in Vienna of the dramma giocoso “Così fan tutte ossia La scuola degli amanti.”
1791Premiere in Prague of the opera seria “La clemenza di Tito” and in Vienna of the Singspiel “Die Zauberflöte.” Clarinet Concerto in A major, K. 622. The Requiem remains unfinished. Dies in Vienna on December 5.

© 2003, 2010 Philipp Reclam jun. GmbH & Co. KG, Stuttgart

About the Authors

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Sylvia Hewig-Tröscher (Editor, Fingering)

Sylvia Hewig-Tröscher studied piano at the Hochschule für Musik in Munich under Erik Then-Bergh and Hermann Reutter, as well as under Louis Hiltbrand at the Conservatoire de Musique in Geneva. 1977 she finished the „ Classe de Virtuosité“ in Geneva with the Premier Prix avec distinction and received the Henry Broliet prize as well as being awarded the GEDOK prize. Also organ studies under Lionel Rogg finishing with the „Diplome d’Orgue“. Masterclasses with George Halmos, Klaus Schilde, Karl Seemann and Wilhelm Kempff, followed, as well as with the cembalo player Li StadelmannIn. 1977 the piano trio Orfeo was established.

Since then, as a solo pianist and chamber musician, her concert activities have led her to Germany, Switzerland, France, Italy, Austria, America, Egypt, India, Korea, and Japan. The list of recordings includes Bayerischer Rundfunk and Südwestfunk Freiburg, Baden-Baden, record and CD recordings of (among others) seldom played works of the classical and romantic periods with Musica Bavarica. Further CD recordings including modern music and first performances with Calig, Symicon, Bayer Records, Arts Magnamedia, and Sony, also co-production of the Bayreischer Rundfunk and Deutscher Musikrat.

Masterclasses in Villa Marteau, Marktoberdorf, Hammelburg, Brixen, Castelnuovo di Garfagnana and New York. Today Sylvia Hewig-Tröscher works as a professor of piano and vice president of the Hochschule für Musik and Theater Munich.

Door alle pianostukken duidelijk te rangschikken en het niveau al in de inhoudsopgave aan te geven, laten de verzamelalbums een speler in één oogopslag zien welk repertoire nu al binnen zijn handbereik ligt en welke muziek pas later aan de orde komt. Dat maakt elk album tot een stimulerend groeiboek, dat de bekende composities een stapje dichterbij brengt. Met een dergelijk album krijgen pianisten van alle niveaus de kans om zelf`aan de piano`te ontdekken dat ze waarschijnlijk tot veel meer in staat zijn dan ze denken.

De Nieuwe Muze, 2018

Historical information and practical notes preface every piece, and the spacious presentation makes them ideal compilations for students. This foray into the educational market is overdue from Henle, and these books are up to the publisher`s high standard.

Pianist, 2018

The sober, soft dark blue cover conceals beautifully edited and printed music on luxury cream paper, with world class binding that we all know will last the rest of our lives. (...) Having had a detailed look at At the Piano: Mozart I am really impressed with the effort that has been made here, resulting a collection that players can really grow with. At the Piano: Mozart will undoubtedly help players foster their understanding and ability to communicate the music of this greatest of composers by bringing together some of his best and most well-loved pieces, while supported with helpful background information, excellent fingering suggestions and authoritative editing. The additional information and understated but beautiful presentation all contribute to a package of inestimable value. Collecting the whole At the Piano series would undoubtedly provide the enthusiastic adult player with a very attractive and progressive medium-term library of the great classics.

pianodao, 2017

At The Piano is an excellent series for students and teachers. Those who fancy learning a major composer’s ‘piano favourites’ will really enjoy working their way through each book. G. Henle have combined a scrupulous ‘pure’ score with plenty of valuable information, offering a fascinating glimpse into the history and style of each composer.

Melanie Spanswick, 2018

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