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Wind Serenade d minor op. 44

About the Composer

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Antonín Dvorák

With Smetana he is the most famous Czech composer of the nineteenth century, contributing to the dissemination and appreciation of Czech music throughout the world. Among his around 200 works, encompassing all standard genres, are nine symphonies, fourteen string quartets, and twelve operas.

1841Born in Nelahozeves (Mühlhausen) on the Vltava River on September 8, the son of a butcher and innkeeper.
1853Attends the training school in Zlonice; there he receives a comprehensive musical education from Josef Toman and the cantor Antonín Liehmann; subsequent education in Česká Kamenice (1856–57).
1857–59Studies at the organ school in Prague. Until 1871 he will earn his living as a music teacher, organist, and violist.
1861String Quintet No. 1 in A minor, considered his first work.
1862Position as solo violist in the orchestra of the Bohemian Provisional Theater (conducted by Smetana, among others)
1873Breakthrough with the premiere in Prague of his patriotic hymn “The Heirs of the White Mountain,” Op. 30. Employment at the private Prague School of Music. Several state scholarships.
1874–77Organist at St. Adalbert church.
from 1876“Moravian Duets,” Opp. 20, 29, 32, and 38 (1876–77), “Slavonic Rhapsodies,” Op. 45 and the first series of “Slavonic Dances,” Op. 46 (both from 1878) enjoy great success. His fame abroad grows.
1882Premiere of the opera “Dimitrij”, in the tradition of grand opera.
1884First invitation to England, after which eight more will follow.
1886Premiere of his oratorio “Saint Ludmila,” Op. 71.
1891Professor of composition at the Prague Conservatory.
1891–95Director of the National Conservatory of Music in New York.
1893Premiere in New York of Symphony No. 9, “From the New World,” Op. 95 (American folkloric elements, cyclic techniques).
1901Premiere in Prague of his most famous opera, “Rusalka.”
1904Premiere in Prague of his last opera, “Armida.” Death in Prague on May 1.

© 2003, 2010 Philipp Reclam jun. GmbH & Co. KG, Stuttgart

About the Authors

Dominik Rahmer (Editor)

Dr. Dominik Rahmer, born in 1971 in Mainz, studied musicology, philosophy and maths in Bonn. He did his Magister Artium in 1999 and his doctorate in 2006 with a thesis on the music criticism of Paul Dukas.

From 2001 to 2011 he was employed at Boosey & Hawkes/Bote & Bock in Berlin, where he also worked on the Critical Edition of the Works of Jacques Offenbach (OEK). Since 2011 he has been an editor at G. Henle Publishers in Munich, with a particular focus on French and Russian music and works for wind instruments.

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